Endpoint Security

Peak‘Apex One’ – it’s difficult to think of a more confident, self-assured name for a new brand!

And it’s a brand on a mission, too – to take the burdensome management out of security. As the Apex One developers put it in their blog, this is about “detecting and blocking as many endpoint threats as possible, without manual intervention.”

This, in turn, translates into less pressure on security teams, lighter workload for security service providers, and less costly time and effort involved overall.

But is this a solution the channel will want to sell? Is it easy and profitable to deploy and manage? And what makes it different from (and better than) what went before?

You can read the full solution brief on our website, but meanwhile here’s our take on it.

Single agent: a game-changer?

Trend’s existing XGen technology already automates threat detection across security layers and endpoints, including PC, Mac and VDI.

But where even the most automated threat detection capability stumbles is the need to use multiple agents to deliver across different kinds of customer deployment – like cloud, on-premise, and hybrid.

Here, Apex One plays a blinder. It has a single agent that is consistent across all customer deployment types, significantly diminishing deployment and ongoing management overheads, and reducing the risk of automation being devalued by interruption.

Given the high proportion of enterprise clients who have complex hybrid environments, this has to be a winner!

Detection and remediation: all done for you!

But security channel partners and in-house security teams alike also need to be sure that what is being automated is the most effective way for dealing with the broadest possible range of threats. Inadequate protection delivered automatically is not a value-add!

Apex One appears to be well ahead of the curve here, however, because it focuses its automation not on preventing threats (an impossible aim), but instead on detecting and removing them.

Unknown or fileless threat? Machine learning and behavioural analysis will spot its threatening characteristics and take action.

Operating system vulnerability? Apex One creates its own virtual patches to prevent zero-day exploits from making it onto any endpoint.

And if you’re hearing echoes of EDR (Endpoint Detection and Response) at this point, it’s true that Apex One offers upsell potential into both Trend’s full EDR and MDR (Managed Detection and Response) solutions - but it’s also important to understand that what Trend have built here is in fact something quite distinct.

Whereas EDR tends fundamentally be a noisy and manual process to manage (as we explained in this earlier post) automated detection and response - which is what Trend call it - neatly does much of it for you.

Manage, visualise, investigate – all in one place

The more you can understand about a threat, the more effective the measures you can take against it.

But the challenge is in corralling all the threat information – including user-based visibility, policy management, and log aggregation - into one place, in a way that makes sense of it.

Apex One has created a centralised console that enables exactly this, so although for some more detailed analysis a connection to an optional EDR dashboard is necessary, visualisation, investigation and reporting are already built into its standard configuration, adding an inbuilt layer of insight that other solutions don’t have.

Conclusions: is Apex One the peak of security for channel partners?

Everyone likes a great name and a strong story, and Apex One has got both in spades – not least because it is in fact essentially the new brand name for the existing Trend endpoint security solution within its Smart Protection Suites solutions family.

But this is not some kind of rebadging exercise to revive a flagging solution – because Trend’s endpoint solution isn’t flagging. Just the opposite, in fact: it has received high praise from industry analysts like Gartner year after year, including in 2018.

But coupling it with a single agent shows that there’s a strategic endgame in mind: to make Trend’s endpoint security solutions as effortless as possible to use across every client environment – and therefore very hard to displace.

For end-clients and channel partners alike – and particularly existing Trend Micro Office Scan users, who will receive Apex One as a regular update at no additional cost - that’s a rebrand that will deliver far more than just a new name and a shiny logo.

Heimdal Security logoHow would your customers feel if they had a Norse warrior stopping malware from reaching their endpoints? Meet Denmark’s Heimdal Security.

In days of old, the sight of Vikings on the horizon was enough to turn decent peasants’ blood to ice.

But the marauding Danes are now playing poacher-turned-gamekeeper – at least in IT security terms.

Because instead of being the threat, they’re now stopping the threats before they make landfall. (Or, at least, before they reach your customers’ endpoints!)

This is what our newest vendor partner Heimdal Security sees as its killer battle cry when compared to traditional endpoint security. And here’s why malware needs to be very afraid of it.

From last-ditch to proactive: endpoint protection transformed

“Form square and stick out your spears” – that’s basically the traditional approach to endpoint protection. Once the problem has hit the machine, the security software rings the panic bell, musters the garrison, and mounts a defence.

We Brits tried that against the (real) Vikings. It didn’t work.

But if we could have spotted their boats as they cast off – or, even better, seen activity on the quayside that indicated an attack being prepared – we could have taken proactive action against them before they reached Blighty.

This is exactly what Heimdal does. Instead of looking at application code and signatures in files that have already entered the endpoint, to work out if there’s a threat, it looks at the undercurrents in the ‘sea’ of network and internet traffic entering and leaving your customers’ businesses, to detect danger before it surfaces.

Rather cleverly, though, this isn’t just about identifying when users are being taken to places they shouldn’t be sailing towards – e.g. malicious websites – and blocking the connection to them before it’s made (although this is certainly important, as we explore below).

It’s also about using advanced machine-learning, heuristics and network forensics to detect apparently harmless network file ‘plankton’ that is in fact fodder for a coming malware attack.

Traditional security protects an endpoint with a last-ditch defence. Heimdal protects it by turning the entire network into a shield wall.

Which one are you betting your krone on?

Multi Layered Security Graphic
Conventional endpoint security is typically missing the traffic-based anti-malware protection that Heimdal delivers.

“Probably the best malware protection in the world…”

The famous Danish beer ad is tongue in cheek. But there’s a serious point to be made here about the strains of malware that Heimdal can protect against that many other security solutions simply can’t.

Take ransomware, for example. Traditional endpoint security looks for malicious code within files, but a ransomware-triggering hyperlink, or instruction to connect to a website, is neither a file nor, in itself, an inherently malicious piece of code. So, the endpoint security software doesn’t spot it.

But Heimdal is looking at the network, not the endpoint. It detects and blocks the malicious connections (to malvertising, legitimate but compromised web banners, malicious iFrames and redirects, botnets etc.) that signal an intention to activate or propagate attack strains like APTs, ransomware, Trojans, polymorphic malware and others.

In short, Heimdal gets stuck into the melee long before the blunt old endpoint battle-axe can!

Automatic software updates: that’s 85% of web app attacks defeated!

Exploit kits and other threats that exploit programs’ existing security weaknesses are a huge worry for traditional endpoint security vendors, because these weaknesses often exist at a lower level than that at which the security solutions operate.

Consequently, exploits can slip underneath the endpoint radar (the bad guys must feel like they’ve died and gone to Valhalla!)

They’re a huge worry for your customers, too, given that some 85% of web app attacks (like the kind that typically trigger ransomware and steal personal financial data) take hold of endpoints through an existing unpatched security hole of this kind.

But here, Heimdal have put a real edge on their sword. They have coupled their network traffic analysis with an automatic software update tool, to ensure that your customers’ internet-facing and non-internet-facing apps  – from Acrobat to Audacity, Flash to Firefox, Java to Jitsi, and many others besides – are constantly and automatically updated with the latest security fixes and patches, thus denying exploit kits an entry point.

The most security-critical applications are often those that are not concerned with security at all – how’s that for a typically innovative Scandinavian way of looking at a problem?

Why Heimdal
“Proactive” is a word you’ll hear a lot from Heimdal – and the automatic patching capability that embodies it is a good third of the company’s overall value proposition. (Click to enlarge)

Heimdal: the new word in security

Bloodthirsty or not, the Vikings gave their name to some very beneficial concepts. The word ‘law’ comes into English from their language, for example – and from where we’re sitting it looks like they’ve done it again with ‘Heimdal’!

(Loosely translated, we think the name means: “Stop the thing that’s trying to attack the longboat before it reaches the longboat.” Genius.)

Time some of your customers learnt some Danish, perhaps?

Failing to correctly configure your security solutions is one of the biggest risks to you and your customers. Security health checks can prevent it.

So, you’ve got your customers’ security covered from all angles, right?

Layered protection that shares security intelligence across applications. Endpoint security that spots malware traditional anti-virus solutions miss. Machine-learning that gets better and better at understanding threats. Belt and braces.

But then you fail to configure it all correctly and your customers get hit anyway!

Sceptical? Look at Amazon’s AWS solution, which has suffered a number of critical security and other misconfigurations, resulting in compromised user data.

Read Gartner, who say that in 2017 misconfiguration will be the most common source of breaches in mobile applications.

And take heed of the Infosec Institute, who place security misconfiguration right in the middle of the top ten cyber-risks in 2017.

Whichever way you slice it, the evidence shows that even the cleverest solutions can be useless if they’re not set up correctly – but how do you go about making sure the security solutions you deliver don’t fall into this trap?

Health checks: an MOT for your security solutions

The answer isn’t rocket science, but it is common sense.

You get your car checked out regularly to ensure it’s running as it should, and to inform you of any action you need to take to keep it fit for purpose. Essentially, it’s a health check for your motor – and you can do exactly the same for the security solutions and services you deliver.

But the even better news is that the security healthcheck is often far less disruptive and time-consuming than taking your car to the local garage.This is because the health check can often be performed by an engineer remotely, using the same web consoles you use to deliver and manage your security offerings every day.

As the engineer finds configuration faults or errors, they document these in a report that includes recommendations for the actions you need to take to fix them.

Who delivers security health checks, and what do they cover?

Where and how you get your security health checks often depends on the support and services arrangements you have with the vendors of the security solutions you sell – although this is not the only way to access them.

You could, for example, go through a specialist security software distributor who has vendor-accredited technical expertise in-house. This means you get vendor-quality product knowledge but through an organisation that is typically smaller, more agile and delivers a more personal service.

Typically, a product security health check delivered in this way will cover the full spectrum of security configuration points (it could be 60 or more) that can become an issue if not properly attended to, including (amongst others):

  • Unresolved malware
  • Patching and security updates
  • Licence status
  • Choice of deployed modules and scan engines
  • Policy and protection compliance
  • Impending end-of-life, end of support, and other OS-related issues
  • Settings (e.g. threat sensitivity); options enabled and disenabled
  • Identification and authentication

Security health checks; who fixes what’s not working?

If you have technically proficient people in your organisation, they can of course take the recommendations of the health check report and act on them.

But how does it work if you haven’t got the necessary technical resources?

Again, think of your car: you have no hesitation in handing over your keys to a trusted specialist to carry out work you couldn’t. Depending on who you get your security health check services from, the same model is potentially available – hands-on, on-site corrective work, billed according to an agreed estimate of the time it takes to complete the job.

(But no expensive mechanical components to cause the sucking in of air between the teeth, of course!)

Insights: safer than consequences

“Prevention is better than cure”, runs the old adage – but when there’s no cure available, the need for prevention becomes even more urgent.

Sadly, you can’t “cure” breach and theft of your customers’ data, for example – once the data’s been taken, it’s an irreversible action.

And if it occurs because a solution you provide wasn’t set up correctly or hadn’t been kept up to date, the legal, reputational and financial consequences for your organisation – particularly under the imminent GDPR regulations – would be severe.

But regular insight into the status of your security solutions and how they have (or haven’t) been applied can wrongfoot the risk before it trips you up.

A healthier situation all round.

 

 

 

End of Road for McAfee Email Security SolutionsAs many McAfee security products slide into end-of-life, we take a look at how it could affect end-users, MSPs and resellers.

Forgive us for being forward, here, but if you didn’t read our last post on the McAfee security products that have entered, or are entering, end-of-life (EOL), you probably need to.

Just to recap, many McAfee EOL products simply don’t have a like-for-like migration path, according to McAfee’s own EOL support pages. In fact, many of them apparently don’t have a migration path at all, and those that do have a distinctly oblique one, involving renamed products and (presumably more expensive) updates.

So if you’re a McAfee end-user, are you worried? If you’re a McAfee MSP or reseller, should you be worried, too?

Worry is never helpful – so here are the plain facts about the McAfee EOL products and how their withdrawal will ultimately affect end-users, MSPs and resellers alike.

Which McAfee products does this EOL problem affect?

Since Intel’s acquisition of McAfee in 2011, there has been a concerted focus on EOL-ing those products that are not core to Intel’s strategy, and so the complete list is a long one.

But three that we think will grab most end-users’ and partners’ attention are:

  • Email Gateway
  • Enterprise Mobility Management
  • Endpoint Encryption

What will this mean for end-users and partners?

Bluntly, whether you’re an end-user or a security partner, EOL means what it says on the tin, or at least in the McAfee end-of-life policy; support for the software product simply stops (“Support contracts cannot extend beyond the end-of-life date”).

Support, of course, includes patches – a critical weapon in the struggle to keep security software updated against new or emerging threats – and so a security product kept in service beyond its EOL date is likely to rapidly become no kind of security product at all.

Map the McAfee products that are going / have gone EOL to the current risk profile of the cyber threat universe and the picture looks even more alarming.

  • McAfee is EOL-ing Email Gateway, yet… malware analysis in this publication shows email-borne malware hit 705 million quarantined messages from just one security vendor in just one month of 2015 alone!
  • McAfee is EOL-ing Enterprise Mobility Management, a solution that enables IT teams and security providers to keep large-scale official and unofficial mobile use in large businesses secure - yet McAfee also admits that the unique mobile malware samples collected in its own laboratories increased 72% from Q3 to Q4 in 2015!
  • McAfee is EOL-ing Endpoint Encryption, yet… the loss or breach of customer data from a mislaid or stolen device that this kind of technology can prevent is about to become a source of huge financial risk to businesses because of the draconian provisions of the forthcoming GDPR legislation!

In short, McAfee are pulling the plug exactly where the bad guys are starting to focus most attention – and that can only end badly for end-users and partners alike.

 But MSPs and resellers can get custom support, right?

Don’t you bet on it. Although custom support, beyond the EOL date, is theoretically available, it’s on McAfee’s say-so – reseller, MSP, end-user or whoever else you are. As they state in their policy, it is “an exception”, not the rule.

Clearly, it also costs. Not only that, it requires an existing current and continuous support contract to be in place, provides only limited content updates, for a limited time period, and with specific terms and conditions.

(Oh, and it never covers hardware of any kind, even if you bought the original solution on a hardware platform).

Does all this infuse the need to migrate to other solutions with a certain sense of urgency?

What happens next?

But knowing you have to migrate is little use if you don’t have any help as to where you might migrate to.

In the last blog in this series, we’ll be exploring some of the other security vendors’ offerings, and discussing whether they’re a good fit for partners and end-users looking to leave McAfee’s EOL products behind.

Keep watching!

McAfee - End of service warning

A raft of McAfee products have gone into end-of-life (EOL) since Intel took over. We look into the issues this is likely to create, now and in the immediate future.

It’s been six years since Intel bought McAfee, during which the company has pursued an aggressive end-of-life (EOL) policy across its product range, unleashing what IT publication CRN called “waves of uncertainty” in its core markets.

A visit to McAfee’s EOL support pages reveals a current drop-down menu listing scores of products that have been put into, or are scheduled to be put into, EOL - meaning no further availability of technical support and essentially, therefore, the impending end of the product’s viability for end-users and partners alike.

And although clear migration paths are available for some of these products, for others they are conspicuous by their absence, or are simply replaced by a (presumably more expensive) “upgrade”.

The outcome is inescapable: multiple security solutions are no longer available from McAfee, and each case of EOL leaves a hole that both end-users and security partners will potentially need to look elsewhere to fill.

McAfee EOL: the critical list

Regrettably, the EOL products that appear to have no clear migration path are also the ones that cover the truly critical threat vectors like networks (Asset Manager), email (Email Gateway), mobile devices (Enterprise Mobility Management), and data protection (Endpoint Encryption).

Unfathomably, even Content Security Suite, which combines many of these defences in one convenient package, is destined for the axe.

Intel spoke of “tough tradeoffs” in making these EOL decisions, but the reality is that they have proven – and will continue to prove - tougher still for customers and partners.

The apparent absence of clarity regarding the migration path from one product to a subsequent version or replacement spells disruption, whichever way you slice it.

Should end-users (and partners) simply trust that Intel will come up with something better? Should they be looking to other vendors? If so, which?

And should they seize the simplicity of “going direct”, where available, or should they source the products through a distributor, where the added link in the supply chain could bring value-adds like services, support, consulting, rewards and benefits, and the like?

Beyond McAfee EOL: what next?

Two points are worth noting here.

Firstly, at least some of McAfee’s products won’t go into EOL for a short while yet - so there is breathing space to find and trial alternatives.

Secondly, the security market is evolving fast. Established players like McAfee are coming under pressure from a swathe of specialist security vendors, including the new “big names” like Trend Micro, as well as agile arrivals like Bitdefender, Malwarebytes and others. Essentially, when McAfee stops delivering, there is no shortage of vendors who could potentially step in.

Watch this space for our next blog, which will explore some of the most compelling post-McAfee options for resellers, MSPs and end-users alike.

Over the last week we have seen an increase in the amount of companies receiving emails containing Zepto Ransomware, a file encrypting virus based on the infamous Locky cryptoware.
Most of the emails have been carefully crafted to ensnare the victims using social engineering techniques, typically greeting the recipient by first name and asking them to open an attachment which they had requested.
zepto image
The attachment will typically be either a .zip extension or .docm extension and once opened will run a malicious JavaScript which then encrypts all files on the users machine with the .zepto extension

To try and combat the infection, we offer the following advice
1. To protect against JavaScript attachments, tell Explorer to open .JS files with Notepad.
2. To protect against VBA malware, tell Office not to allow macros in documents from the internet.
3. Ensure your AntiMalware program is upto date
4. Ensure your users are careful with email attachments and only open the ones they are sure they have requested
5. If possible set email filtering to quarantine all .zip and .docm files

Brian-A-Jackson1

On a weekly basis there are now articles regarding a big brand company which has been hacked, these usually relate to what data has been lost, how they are notifying those affected and what they are going to be doing to prevent this from happening again.

So how do you prevent it from happening in the first place?

From experience I can see that if a hacker wants to get details from somewhere they will take the easiest target, the ‘Low Hanging Fruit’ as they say, in ensuring your company has some basic security principles in place can help mitigate this.

So how do you ensure you are not the ‘Low Hanging Fruit’

Simple measures can be taken within your environment to help secure it. As a basic level you should be meeting the following guide - CyberEssentials Requirements

This sets out some advice regarding Firewalls, User access control, Passwords, Malware protection and Patch management.

Once you have met the standards given within this document you should be looking to increase the security standards within your organisation. The most effective we have found is the use of education, once educated your staff will be able to react to the threats quicker and reduce the risks to your company.

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Our top security updates in the news and on the web this week

1.10 tips to avoid Cyber Monday scams

Shoppers familiar with the Cyber Monday circus know they’re stepping into the lion’s den. The Internet has always been a lawless place. First posted on Malwarebytes.

For the original post and further information click here

2. More POS malware, just in time for Christmas

Threat researchers are warning of two pieces of point of sales malware that have gone largely undetected during years of retail wrecking and now appear likely to earn VXers a haul over the coming festive break. First posted on The Register.

For the original post and further information click here

3. Some simple security advice for computer and smartphone users

Demonstrated how easy it can be to compromise users computers and 'steal' very personal video and photos, here's some really simple advice to help prevent this happening. First posted on Pen Test partners.

For the original post and further information click here

4. CryptoWall Updates, New Families of Ransomware Found

The ransomware threat isn't just growing—it's expanding as well. There has been a recent surge of reports on updates for existing crypto-ransomware variants. First posted on Trend Micro.

For the original post and further information click here

ransomware-update

5. Blast from the Past: Blackhole Exploit Kit Resurfaces in Live Attacks

The year is 2015 and a threat actor is using the defunct Blackhole exploit kit in active drive-by download campaigns via compromised websites. First posted on Malwarebytes.

For the original post and further information click here

6. Another Day, Another HMRC Tax Phish…

We could all do with a bit of a tax refund right before the festive season, and wouldn’t you know it. First posted on Malwarebytes.

For the original post and further information click here

7. Diving into Linux. Encoder’s predecessor: a tale of blind reverse engineering 

Linux.Encoder.1 has earned a reputation as the worlds first Ransomware family tailored for Linux platforms. First posted on Bitdefender Labs.

For the original post and further information click here

If you have any security news that you would like to see on our blog please send it to us at bluesolutions, please include the link from the original article in the email.

Windows10

Article originally published on the Malwarebytes website

It’s that time again, a new operating system emerges from the Microsoft incubator! While many of you might not get to experience Windows 10 just yet or even in the foreseeable future, we want you to know that when you decide to use it, Malwarebytes has got your back.

The latest versions of our Malwarebytes products supports Windows 10! And that includes:

  • Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Free
  • Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Premium
  • Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Free
  • Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit Premium
  • Malwarebytes Anti-Malware for Business
  • Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit for Business
  • Malwarebytes Anti-Malware Remediation Tool

So one of the first things you should do after setting up your new operating system is to download Malwarebytes Anti-Malware. Trust me, the cyber criminals won’t wait until everyone is comfortable with Windows 10 to start targeting folks using it.

To download the latest Malwarebytes Anti-Malware on your new Win 10 system, click here.

Find out more about Malwarebytes at www.bluesolutions.co.uk/malwarebytes/. Call our sales team today on 0118 9898 222 for a free trial or demo.

Malwarebytes Image

Originally published on the Malwarebytes Security Blog

May 6 marked the 15 year anniversary of the infamous ILOVEYOU (Love Letter) email virus. The virus is regarded as the first major virus spread by email.

ILOVEYOU reportedly infected tens of millions of computers worldwide, and cost billions of dollars in damage.

Once a machine was infected with ILOVEYOU, the virus scanned the Windows Address Book and subsequently sent copies of itself to every contact within the list. Using the public’s lack of email security to its advantage, the virus was able to masquerade as a legitimate attachment sent by a known acquaintance.

This simple social engineering tactic allowed the virus to propagate world-wide quickly and efficiently.

In the years since ILOVEYOU, we’ve all learned lots regarding email security and ‘best practices’ to use when downloading attachments. There have been numerous articles, write-ups, warnings, and suggestions advising users to be wary when opening attachments that come via email – even when from a trusted source.

Despite more than a decade and a half of these warnings, email is still a primary vector for the installation of malicious software.

The M3AAWG Email Metrics Report, released Q2 of 2014, indicates that over a three-month tracking period, a whopping 987 billion “abusive” emails were identified as being successfully delivered.

While this pales in comparison to the other 9+ trillion emails blocked by the mail providers, this number demonstrates just how successful  a vector email is for malicious actors to use to compromise their victims.

While the M3AAWG report doesn’t distinguish between emails with malicious attachments and other types of abusive emails such as phishing emails, it’s reasonable to assume that at least a significant percentage of the abusive emails did indeed contain a malicious attachment.

As indicated by the report, the vast majority of these messages are blocked by large email providers such as Microsoft and Google, but despite the best efforts of these companies, many messages still find their way through the filters.  Here is an example of a malicious email I received to my personal email account just the other day.

MalSpam1

The success of these malware campaigns relies in numbers. With an estimated 205 billion emails sent each day, it seems to be a herculean, if not almost impossible task to prevent each and every malicious email from being delivered.

We would all be quite peeved if that important document from our boss wasn’t delivered to our email box, or if that emergency change in insurance wasn’t received from HR.

The big email providers know this, so they are forced to tread lightly when determining if an attachment is malicious or not. The problem is malicious actors know this too.  So for them, it’s just a numbers game.

If one address gets blocked, use another. If one message is blocked, send one more – better yet, send a million more. And there in-lies the issue that we in the security field face when it comes to preventing you from seeing (and in the case of malware – blocking) this sort of garbage all together.

A small portion of over-all attempted deliveries and an even smaller percentage of successful installs is all that’s needed to claim success.

Malware authors utilise a dizzying array of tools, services, and botnets to facilitate delivery of malicious email. Email addresses are spoofed. The subject and body can be dynamically generated using unique information to help provide a sense of legitimacy to the email. Most attachments are randomized both in name and MD5’s to thwart detection.

Geo-location is used to send emails to users of a particular region, city, or post code. And the subject matter of emails constantly changes to play into the fears, desires, and dreams of every potential person.

MalSpam2

Attachments are not limited to .zips either. Attachments have been seen to arrive in .exe format (although rare with large email providers), .scr, .pdf, .com, .js, or a variety of others. Here we can see how some attachments attempt to appear legitimate.  Take notice of the large spaces between filenames and the .exe extension on a few of the attachments.

MalSpam3

Remember, it only takes a small portion of sent emails, and an even smaller percentage of those to be clicked, in order for a malware author to claim a particular spam-run successful.

The reality is, these people wouldn’t use email as an attack vector if it didn’t work – but it does.

The only reason it does is because a small percentage of us still click such attachments thinking there may be some legitimacy to the content.

Despite 15 years of warnings, billions of dollars in damages, and countless attacks attributed to email, we have yet to learn the dangers of downloading unsolicited attachments.

So for the sake of humanity (a bit dire, I know) please quit clicking attachments from people you don’t know, or from contacts where the content appears suspicious.

If there is a question if the email is legitimate, contact the sender and inquire.

If you didn’t order anything online, don’t click the Word document advising you of your recent purchase.

If you haven’t done so already, configure Windows to always show file extensions. That way, if you do download and extract a malicious attachment, you can hopefully see if any trickery is being played with spaces between the visible filename and the extension.

And most importantly, educate someone you know who would never read this (or any) security blog as to hopefully help them from succumbing to the ever-changing tactics of malware spam.

Blue Solutions is now a distributor for Malwarebytes- read the press release here. Call our team on 0118 9898 222 and they'll help with any questions or arrange a free trial.