Tag Archives: Managed Services

Bitdefender have updated their GravityZone cloud console with some new features over the weekend and here at Blue Solutions we are happy to guide you through these changes and how they will affect you and your customers.

Anti-Ransomware

The big news is that Bitdefender has now incorporated Anti Ransomware vaccine to all its cloud customers, and will be rolling this out through the on-premise version on Tuesday 27th Sep 2016.  This module is activated through the policy section  Antimalware --> On Access settings

Gravityzone Ransomware Vaccine Policy Setting
Gravityzone Ransomware Vaccine Policy Setting

By activating this module, machines will be protected from all currently known forms of Ransomware.

Other New Features

Update Rings - this feature allows Administrators of the program to  chose when in the validation cycle an update is received.

Anti-Exploit Techniques - a new set of powerful techniques which further enhances existing technologies to fight targeted attacks.  These are integrated into the existing Advanced Threat Control module.

Web Access Control Rules - The categories list has been updated with multiple new categories added.

Exchange Protection - This can now be enabled/disabled when editing a customer with a monthly license subscription.

 

The above features are now in place for all current users of Bitdefender Gravityzone in the cloud and will be rolled out to Bitdefender Gravityzone on-premise users from the 27th Sep 2016.

For more details on the above features and a look at the other features included please click here

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Benefits of managed IT servicesTwo thirds of companies now use managed service providers (CompTIA survey). But how should MSPs educate customers about the services they provide? See these tips.

In my last post, I wrote about the benefits of selling services through the MSP model, rather than relying on old-fashioned, unpredictable break-fix.

All well and good, but that’s often also about selling your customers on something new and different, when they’re used to something established and familiar – and we all know how difficult that can be!

So I spoke to some customers and some colleagues, and cast around on the internet, and came up with these useful tips to help you convince your customers that MSP is the way forward!

1. Don’t major on the technology. As this article in CRN eloquently argues, the mechanics of features and functions are absolutely not what will prompt your customer to make a decision in favour of MSP.

What your customers are really interested in is how MSP solutions can help them decrease risk, reduce costs, and – perhaps most critically of all – increase productivity.

Industry reports and analysis can strongly support your pitch in this respect. Comptia’s annual Trends In Managed Services research, for example, (you can see a non-gated slideshow summary here), contains some excellent references to productivity gains, savings, and ROI, all of which will be useful to you in a sales situation.


2. Ditch the “jargon monoxide”.
Do you have any idea how downright poisonous some of the language accepted in IT circles can be to someone seeking to make a purchasing decision?

Simplicity and clarity are watchwords in any sales situation, but when you’re trying to persuade a customer to abandon the break-fix model that they may have trusted for many years, they become critical. Test your pitch on friends, family members, and deeply non-technical colleagues – and if they don’t instantly “get it”, rethink it.

The psychological impact of obscure language is immensely damaging to MSP sales relationships – as this piece in MSPblog explains. Want to make your customer feel stupid? Make them feel like they’re excluded from your clique? Want to make it sound like you’re lying through your teeth? Then carry on using the jargon.

Change is already disruptive and painful for customers – don’t make it unfathomable and repellent too.


3. Get over the monthly rate objection.
From your point of view, the fixed monthly payment for your MSP services makes perfect sense – regular, predictable income in return for always-on monitoring and service.

Only, many customers won’t necessarily get that last part. In their mind, the choice you are giving them is between a monthly outflow of cash to protect them against something that “might never happen”, and an hourly rate that they only have to pay if something goes wrong.

The way to convince them is to highlight just how bad things could get if that something does go wrong. Would they get hit by financial loss if they were to experience more than, say, an hour’s downtime, for example?

How much have they invested in their IT infrastructure and how much more would they have to add to that to cover hourly-rate remediation in the event of something like major data loss or theft?

You won’t have to search very far to find some seriously compelling statistics on this subject. I wrote in another post recently that 58% of SMBs could not withstand any data loss whatsoever.

Consider, in addition, that data loss and downtime cost the UK £10.5 billion per year, according to this piece in TechWeek Europe, and one Gartner analyst has cited an hourly downtime cost, based on company size and type, of between $140,000 and $540,000 per hour!


4. Listen to pain points and tailor solutions.
The MSP model has brought a flexibility to the sales process that previously didn’t exist – particularly when it is teamed with solutions delivered through the cloud that can be switched on and off and scaled up and down on demand.

In fact, the reality is that there are very few solutions you couldn’t offer in an MSP version to meet your customers’ varied needs. From endpoint security, to data backup and recovery, and of course much more, it’s all up for grabs – but you need to understand your customers’ pain points first!

As MSPAlliance recently put it, (my italics), "MSPs must become supremely comfortable interacting with customers on a business level. This means knowing the business of your customers and being able to ask questions and listen to what causes them pain. Once the pain point has been identified, a technical solution to it can be created."


5. Master the proposal process.
It’s not only complex language that turns your MSP prospects off, it’s a sales proposal process that feels like it’s trying to funnel them into a one-size-fits-all solution, exacerbating their fear of the new and unknown.

The MSP model makes possible multiple alternative solutions in multiple combinations, so use them to give your customers a sense of choice and control. This isn’t break-fix-land, where every additional solution ratchets up the risk of an hourly-rate repair job, so don’t pitch it like it is!

For a superb, methodical sales proposal process that will help you to convincingly align solutions options with your MSP customers’ needs, check out this MSP blog post.


Get selling to your MSP customers!

I’ve said enough now – it’s your turn to evangelise! But remember, if you’re asking your customers to turn their back on the devil they know, they might need a little help understanding that MSP solutions could be their guardian angel…

BS-RMM

What’s behind the importance of Remote Monitoring and Management (RMM) tools in the partner universe?

As Techopedia helpfully explains, RMM is the “proactive, remote tracking of network and computer health”, and typically delivers a set of IT management tools that enable technical staff to maintain service delivery more efficiently and productively - like trouble ticket tracking, and remote desktop monitoring and support.

But, inevitably, not all RMM solutions are created equal. So what is it that makes for a RMM tool that keeps your customers happy and your support teams’ productivity keen?

We looked into a number of recent comparative articles and reviews (like this one in Business Solutions and this one in TechTarget’s SearchIT Channel, amongst others) and came up with this (hopefully!) helpful wish-list:

1. Ease of deployment

“The choice you make when selecting RMM software often boils down to the best combination of integration, deployment and automation characteristics”, writes SearchIT Channel’s John Moore, and to my mind, deployment ranks right at the top of this hierarchy.

Why? Because the less you can disrupt your (and, by potential extension, your customers’) business with your RMM deployment, the better.

So look for solutions that can deploy selectively to one device or a group of devices, and to one location or multiple locations, in one smooth movement.

Consider the hardware onboarding, too; automatic provisioning is far less disruptive than manual, but Mobile Device Management (MDM), for example, will need to be cross-platform (iOS and Android) and offer easy enrolment and configuration functions.

Ultimately, you need to be comfortable with the vendor’s and solution provider’s role in all this, too. What sort of hand-holding or on-boarding will you receive during those crucial first few weeks? Is it restricted to self-help online tutorials, or will it follow a structured statement of work delivered by an engineer on a 1-to-1 basis?

And will they offer you any kind of satisfaction guarantee to protect you against the potential infelicities that shifting a hefty slice of your business productivity to a single platform could occasion?

Much of this is driven, in reality, by whether you choose a cloud-based RMM platform or an on-premise one – so shop around for solutions providers who offer options, to enable you to properly balance risk and return.

 2. Asset coverage and management

RMM can’t effectively monitor or manage anything unless it’s pointing to the right sources of information, and has within it the appropriate management tools.

Your RMM solution needs to work tightly with customers’ workstations, servers, printers, routers and mobile devices, but you also need to be able to slice and dice the monitoring and management by whatever criteria suit you best in any particular situation – by OS, by application, by location, and so forth.

The more geographically, technically, and logistically complex your and your customers’ operations, the more beef you need under your RMM bonnet!


3. Usability and minimal training requirements

Whichever kind of RMM you deploy, users have to be able to use it! For partners and MSPs, that’s principally operators in their own organisation (technical support staff, or perhaps, on occasion, account managers) but customers might need access to the solution, too (in a corporate enterprise deployment scenario, for example)          .

Either way, complexity can spell disaster. The Standish Group, a research outfit that tracks corporate IT purchases, has found that complexity is at the root of some 66% of all IT project failures or late deliveries.

Consequently, your RMM solution has to be built on intuitive features that are easy to master, should be able to orchestrate workflows to prevent human error, and must generally reduce the learning curve for the operators.

Look in particular for features like pre-configured groups, searches, templates and schedules, so that your teams don’t have to hand-craft monitoring and corrective routines on a day-to-day basis.

4. Automation

Related to what I said above about training, automation is the secret ingredient in making an RMM solution function effectively out of the box, and therefore enhancing the productivity and customer satisfaction it can deliver.

In any event, insist on pre-loaded monitors and alerts (so that you can go from both proactive and reactive investigation.)

But be wary: you need to get to the bottom of how quickly and precisely you can choose which of the hundreds of automated elements should be ‘on’ and which should be ‘off’. Does it involve cumbersome, costly trawling through countless groups, and individually cherry-picking the elements?

Or is there a more business-driven approach (such as allowing you to selectively turn off, say, all the Exchange or SQL server performance monitors at once, as opposed to their individual constituents?)

In the search for RMM zen, not all automation is nirvana!

5. Remote capability

Of course, none of this really works for your customers at all if your RMM solution’s remote support capability is lacking. If you can’t easily deliver support straight to a user’s screen, you’re not providing much of a service.

In an ideal world, the “stealth” functions of the RMM platform – the ones that enable you to support customers by making helpful changes and adjustments to their machines without them even knowing, and without interrupting their work – rule.

But sometimes, interrupting the user is unavoidable. Whichever situation you find yourself in, prefer a RMM solution with a native remote support capability, rather than a connection to a third-party one.

The former is controllable from within the solution itself, with one click, alongside all the solution’s other functions (the oft-cited “single pane of glass” approach) and will deliver a more seamless support experience to the end-user.

6. Integration capability

Finally, integration looms large on many MSPs’ and resellers’ RMM agendas. The ability to work with a “supporting cast” of existing applications (including security) not only diminishes customers’ operational headaches, it also creates a three-stage virtuous commercial circle.

The RMM solution becomes saleable because it works securely with existing applications sold by the partner, enabling it to potentially add an extra revenue stream to each customer.

New applications become saleable because they can be easily controlled thanks to the RMM solution, enabling the partner to into existing customers.

And for new customers? Rinse and repeat on both counts!

RMM: which solution to choose?

Essentially, it boils down to this: MSPs and resellers don’t know how their markets are going to diversify in the future. They may be selling one kind of service today, tomorrow it could be another, depending on where there’s profit to be made.

But they’ll all be online, they’ll all be remote, and they’ll all bankrupt the partner if they don’t integrate with a RMM solution that helps to transform the burden of keeping the service running into a highly automated – rather than costly manual – process.

One RMM solution to serve them all? Now that would be a great thing to sell.