Tag Archives: Cloud Security

Cloud SecurityCloud security is often as nebulous a term as the word ‘cloud’ suggests! We look into its various meanings and identify where it can add value to channel partners’ propositions.

Cloud security is one of those terms that has morphed rapidly to mean several different things in a very short time. Result? Confusion, more often than not.

Are we talking about security solutions delivered to users from the cloud? Or security around applications that live in the cloud (like Office 365)? Or security that’s targeted at businesses that make use of public cloud services like AWS?

You see the challenge. But actually, each of these is a valid scenario and a saleable cloud security solution. Here’s more info.

1. Security services delivered from the cloud

Your SME customer has few or no IT specialists in the organisation, no money to hire them, and nowhere to store servers. Where do they turn?

To the cloud, of course. Security products are delivered to them via the internet, as a service.

They can typically choose to pay only for what they use, on a monthly ‘rental’ (managed service, or MSP) model, so there are no prohibitive upfront costs.

Their security partner (you!) monitors their networks from a centralised console, makes technical adjustments, and implements patches and upgrades, but the user can retain some control over their security settings if they wish.

But what kind of security solutions can be delivered in this way? Many.

Hosted email security, for example, works with most hosted and on-premise email systems to protect what is stilll the primary route into organisations for most forms of malware and spam.

More comprehensive business security services solutions and cloud security solutions designed specifically for MSPs provide wider protection to end-users, and also enable partners to sell into organisations who have some on-premise systems, but don’t wish to overburden them by adding security software into them.

In this scenario, end-users can run everything else on-premise, but get their security from the cloud!

2. Security for applications that live in the cloud

Solutions like Office 365 have revolutionised office processes, with powerful tools delivered to end-users’ desktops straight from the cloud.

But although the delivery mechanisms for these applications are secure, the content delivered by the applications can still contain threats that the application’s own in-built security can’t detect, as we explored in this cloud apps post a while ago.

Plugging these holes is still a big opportunity for resellers and other security channel partners – and the cloud app security solutions that can help them deliver this critical service are already ‘out there’.

3. Security for public cloud services

SaaS, IaaS, PaaS – businesses’ ability to build their entire proposition on a public cloud provider is no longer the preserve of large enterprises.

In fact, Forbes has ascribed the growth of AWS, for example, to their “Reaching out to all kinds of customers – startups, SMEs and big companies”.

It is this that has driven, in turn, a new kind of security need amongst end-users, as we explained not so long ago in this post - namely, the ability to spin up an AWS virtual server and know that server will immediately be protected by security software that has been specifically designed from the ground up for virtual environments.

We had a bit of fun defining these virtualised must-haves in this security opinion paper recently, but the message is deadly serious: if end-users are building a business on public cloud, and relying on virtual servers, security partners need to be able to reassure them that they can secure it!

Cloud security – evolving meanings, evolving opportunities

As the cloud billows ever more energetically within businesses’ operations, it drives the security agenda in many different directions at once. Cloud security is coming at us from many different angles, and is morphing into multiple meanings.

It’s a wise security partner who has got a handle on them all – and knows the security solutions that play strongest to each definition.

Bitdefender have updated their GravityZone cloud console with some new features over the weekend and here at Blue Solutions we are happy to guide you through these changes and how they will affect you and your customers.

Anti-Ransomware

The big news is that Bitdefender has now incorporated Anti Ransomware vaccine to all its cloud customers, and will be rolling this out through the on-premise version on Tuesday 27th Sep 2016.  This module is activated through the policy section  Antimalware --> On Access settings

Gravityzone Ransomware Vaccine Policy Setting
Gravityzone Ransomware Vaccine Policy Setting

By activating this module, machines will be protected from all currently known forms of Ransomware.

Other New Features

Update Rings - this feature allows Administrators of the program to  chose when in the validation cycle an update is received.

Anti-Exploit Techniques - a new set of powerful techniques which further enhances existing technologies to fight targeted attacks.  These are integrated into the existing Advanced Threat Control module.

Web Access Control Rules - The categories list has been updated with multiple new categories added.

Exchange Protection - This can now be enabled/disabled when editing a customer with a monthly license subscription.

 

The above features are now in place for all current users of Bitdefender Gravityzone in the cloud and will be rolled out to Bitdefender Gravityzone on-premise users from the 27th Sep 2016.

For more details on the above features and a look at the other features included please click here

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Over the last week we have seen an increase in the amount of companies receiving emails containing Zepto Ransomware, a file encrypting virus based on the infamous Locky cryptoware.
Most of the emails have been carefully crafted to ensnare the victims using social engineering techniques, typically greeting the recipient by first name and asking them to open an attachment which they had requested.
zepto image
The attachment will typically be either a .zip extension or .docm extension and once opened will run a malicious JavaScript which then encrypts all files on the users machine with the .zepto extension

To try and combat the infection, we offer the following advice
1. To protect against JavaScript attachments, tell Explorer to open .JS files with Notepad.
2. To protect against VBA malware, tell Office not to allow macros in documents from the internet.
3. Ensure your AntiMalware program is upto date
4. Ensure your users are careful with email attachments and only open the ones they are sure they have requested
5. If possible set email filtering to quarantine all .zip and .docm files

Brian-A-Jackson1

On a weekly basis there are now articles regarding a big brand company which has been hacked, these usually relate to what data has been lost, how they are notifying those affected and what they are going to be doing to prevent this from happening again.

So how do you prevent it from happening in the first place?

From experience I can see that if a hacker wants to get details from somewhere they will take the easiest target, the ‘Low Hanging Fruit’ as they say, in ensuring your company has some basic security principles in place can help mitigate this.

So how do you ensure you are not the ‘Low Hanging Fruit’

Simple measures can be taken within your environment to help secure it. As a basic level you should be meeting the following guide - CyberEssentials Requirements

This sets out some advice regarding Firewalls, User access control, Passwords, Malware protection and Patch management.

Once you have met the standards given within this document you should be looking to increase the security standards within your organisation. The most effective we have found is the use of education, once educated your staff will be able to react to the threats quicker and reduce the risks to your company.

McAfee Security

It’s getting to that time of year when thoughts turn to peace and goodwill, and we look to reward those who have worked hard and the customers who have stayed loyal.

Which is why the big bag of coal that McAfee has dropped in your Christmas stocking this year is an especially nasty surprise. For you and your customers alike.

McAfee – the situation

Here’s the Christmas story, McAfee-style.

Firstly, you buy MX Logic to strengthen your digital security portfolio. Then, you get bought by Intel. Then Intel drops your name. Then Intel says that it’s working on a comprehensive new security package, and promptly puts McAfee’s SaaS email security into end-of-life.

It’s the gift that keeps on giving. Because although the announcement was originally reported at the end of October, we’ve since learnt that many other security offerings (like Nuvotera, Spam Soap, Spambrella, etc.) were white-labelling McAfee’s service, so end-of-life becomes a potentially huge issue for all of them – and the end-users they serve.


“What does this mean for me and for my customers?”

In January 2016, Intel Security will stop selling McAfee SaaS Endpoint and SaaS Email Protection and Archiving, with the majority of subscriptions and support ending in 2017.  As this table shows, some limited support will continue for certain subscriptions until 2021.

Now, Christmas hangovers don’t usually come this early in the month, but rest assured that the decision to discontinue McAfee SaaS products represents one ho-ho-ho-hell of a headache for partners.

They must now identify new solutions and then go through entire deployment and provisioning processes all over again - just so their customers can keep the endpoint and email security that they’ve previously enjoyed.

They have to factor in the time it takes to learn new technology and user interfaces (this includes both internal and customer training), how pricing models will be affected, and what support they need to give and receive.


A frenetic festive season for McAfee users

Needless to say, all this is a massive annoyance to end-user customers, too.

Apart from all the usual pain associated with sudden business and technology platform change, across potentially hundreds or thousands of users, email security often gives rise to complex requirements around archiving - as explained in guides like this one – through which Intel has now successfully driven a sleigh and reindeers.

While customers’ email archiving will continue until their subscriptions’ expiry dates, new emails will no longer be archived after the subscription has expired.

Additionally, customers will only have six months to import their archived emails into their new platform, and any emails that have not been moved at that point will be permanently deleted.


What should partners do next?

If there’s a cheering undertone to this seasonal lament, it’s this: SaaS is an enduringly and increasingly popular delivery model for email, security, and archiving, and is not going away anytime soon.

Add to this the fact that there are other vendors that can provide similar security solutions, and my advice to partners seeking new solutions providers boils down to these basic points:

  • Security pedigree: How long has the solution provider been in business?  Are they security-focused (i.e. how much of their business does security represent? Do they seem distracted by other revenue streams?)
  • Reputation: Who do they partner with (e.g. software distributors) and what level of respect do those partners have in the security space? What do their partners say about them publicly? Will they let you speak with partner references privately? If not, why not?
  • Support: Can you access live customer support whenever needed, provided by employees of that company? If the support expertise is coming from somewhere else, is that support provider trained and qualified? Where’s the proof (certification)?
  • Commitment to the Channel: Does the vendor offer good margins, friendly terms, competitive pricing? Do they have proven relationships with distributors and other partners who can add value through automated management tools, MSP options, dedicated account managers?

Wanting to move quickly to transition your customers to viable alternatives, don’t end up choosing alternative vendors who aren’t truly viable.

(That would be turkeys voting for Christmas.)


“So where do I point my McAfee customers now?”

As a specialist security software distributor who’s been working with some of the world’s biggest security names for over 15 years - and some very agile newer ones, too - I’m ideally placed to consider the choices that your customers can make.

I’m not going to tell you that any one vendor is now the definitive star on the top of the Christmas tree. (Intel has hastily named Proofpoint as a quick fix for McAfee customers, and to me it smacks of expediency, rather than suitability).

But consider this: if a security vendor’s business was born in the cloud, and has been established almost as long as my own, I regard it as being worth a look.

If it offers 24/7 support, is capable of securing much more than just email, and has innovative pricing plans that means savings can be passed on to the end-users, it’s worth a look.

If it protects more than 8.5 million mailboxes for over 47,000 corporate clients worldwide, but is still prepared to give you and your customers a free trial to try it out for yourselves, it’s worth a look.

So do you want to keep the present under wraps until Christmas? Or do you want to be the one to bear early gifts to all those desperate McAfee customers? It’s your call, but ripping off the paper is as easy as this.

And the Three Wise Men? That’ll be the first three partners who click on the link above…