Daily Archives: 28/06/2017

vaccineOrganisations in Europe and the US have been crippled by a ransomware attack known as ‘Petya’. There are claims of a ‘vaccine’ to stop it – but how credible are they?

Hot on the heels of WannaCry comes Petya – a nasty ransomware variant, based on the Goldeneye code.

It has already locked some of the world’s most prominent enterprises out of their data, including construction materials company Saint-Gobain, food giant Mondelez, legal firm DLA Piper, and advertising firm WPP.

But lo! There is a ‘vaccine’ that protects against it, apparently! Simply include the file C:\Windows\perfc.dat on the PC, and the ransomware is stopped in its tracks.

(Well, it’s stopped in its tracks on that machine – though it can still propagate to other machines on the network. So still not ideal.)

We took a look at what some security vendors are saying about Petya / Goldeneye – and whether the idea of a ‘vaccine’ is truly credible.

Bitdefender: ransomware vaccine is old news

The first thing that struck us is that security vendor Bitdefender has had a ransomware vaccine available for some time now, and it’s not just a quick fix using a read-only file.

Instead, it’s rather cleverer than that. It tricks ransomware into believing the machine is already infected, and so the attack goes looking elsewhere. In addition, it can be deployed to every machine on a network simply by ticking a box – meaning that one machine can’t pass the infection to another.

There’s little information at present, admittedly, as to whether this vaccine is effective specifically against the Petya /Goldeneye attack.

However, it has been stated publicly in the Bitdefender Resource Center that “Bitdefender blocks the currently known samples of the new GoldenEye variant. If you are running a Bitdefender security solution for consumer or business, your computers are not in danger.”

That’s pretty unequivocal. And what’s particularly interesting with this vendor is that the ransomware vaccine is standalone – businesses don’t need to have invested in Bitdefender’s suite of other security solutions to use it.

Trend Micro: decrypt it if you can’t stop it

Trend Micro has an established stable of solutions that provide layered protection against a whole range of threats, including ransomware, so they’d surely argue that a ransomware vaccine is unnecessary!

However, what they do also offer is decryptor tools that enable users to recover data even after their files have been encrypted by certain variants of ransomware.

Again, whether these solutions are effective against the most recent Petya / Goldeneye attack is not clear, although Trend Micro states here that it is “in the process of adding known variant and component detections” for Petya-related patterns “and all products that utilise them.”

So, more antidote than vaccine – but it’s worth noting that these decryption tools are free, so they could be a lifesaver (and pave the way to more proactive anti-ransomware strategies and product choices in the future).

Malwarebytes: no ransomware vaccine, but you're safe

Malwarebytes, for its part, has been less than confident about the ability of the C:\Windows\perfc.dat vaccine to stop the Petya infection – in fact, the company states that “our own tests have shown that in many cases, it doesn’t.”

Whilst Windows 10 systems, Malwarebytes says, “seem to have a fighting chance” by using this method, “Windows 7 gets infected every time.”

However, Malwarebytes also publicly says that customers using Malwarebytes Endpoint Security are protected against this specific ransomware variant – so, once again, a vaccine is – theoretically, at least – unnecessary.

Ransomware: vaccines, protection, remediation

For more of our thoughts on ransomware and what security vendors are doing to fight against it, check out our previous post here.

And remember – prevention is better than cure, so keep patching!