Life after McAfee: How will it affect YOU? (Blog 2 of 3)

End of Road for McAfee Email Security SolutionsAs many McAfee security products slide into end-of-life, we take a look at how it could affect end-users, MSPs and resellers.

Forgive us for being forward, here, but if you didn’t read our last post on the McAfee security products that have entered, or are entering, end-of-life (EOL), you probably need to.

Just to recap, many McAfee EOL products simply don’t have a like-for-like migration path, according to McAfee’s own EOL support pages. In fact, many of them apparently don’t have a migration path at all, and those that do have a distinctly oblique one, involving renamed products and (presumably more expensive) updates.

So if you’re a McAfee end-user, are you worried? If you’re a McAfee MSP or reseller, should you be worried, too?

Worry is never helpful – so here are the plain facts about the McAfee EOL products and how their withdrawal will ultimately affect end-users, MSPs and resellers alike.

Which McAfee products does this EOL problem affect?

Since Intel’s acquisition of McAfee in 2011, there has been a concerted focus on EOL-ing those products that are not core to Intel’s strategy, and so the complete list is a long one.

But three that we think will grab most end-users’ and partners’ attention are:

  • Email Gateway
  • Enterprise Mobility Management
  • Endpoint Encryption

What will this mean for end-users and partners?

Bluntly, whether you’re an end-user or a security partner, EOL means what it says on the tin, or at least in the McAfee end-of-life policy; support for the software product simply stops (“Support contracts cannot extend beyond the end-of-life date”).

Support, of course, includes patches – a critical weapon in the struggle to keep security software updated against new or emerging threats – and so a security product kept in service beyond its EOL date is likely to rapidly become no kind of security product at all.

Map the McAfee products that are going / have gone EOL to the current risk profile of the cyber threat universe and the picture looks even more alarming.

  • McAfee is EOL-ing Email Gateway, yet… malware analysis in this publication shows email-borne malware hit 705 million quarantined messages from just one security vendor in just one month of 2015 alone!
  • McAfee is EOL-ing Enterprise Mobility Management, a solution that enables IT teams and security providers to keep large-scale official and unofficial mobile use in large businesses secure - yet McAfee also admits that the unique mobile malware samples collected in its own laboratories increased 72% from Q3 to Q4 in 2015!
  • McAfee is EOL-ing Endpoint Encryption, yet… the loss or breach of customer data from a mislaid or stolen device that this kind of technology can prevent is about to become a source of huge financial risk to businesses because of the draconian provisions of the forthcoming GDPR legislation!

In short, McAfee are pulling the plug exactly where the bad guys are starting to focus most attention – and that can only end badly for end-users and partners alike.

 But MSPs and resellers can get custom support, right?

Don’t you bet on it. Although custom support, beyond the EOL date, is theoretically available, it’s on McAfee’s say-so – reseller, MSP, end-user or whoever else you are. As they state in their policy, it is “an exception”, not the rule.

Clearly, it also costs. Not only that, it requires an existing current and continuous support contract to be in place, provides only limited content updates, for a limited time period, and with specific terms and conditions.

(Oh, and it never covers hardware of any kind, even if you bought the original solution on a hardware platform).

Does all this infuse the need to migrate to other solutions with a certain sense of urgency?

What happens next?

But knowing you have to migrate is little use if you don’t have any help as to where you might migrate to.

In the last blog in this series, we’ll be exploring some of the other security vendors’ offerings, and discussing whether they’re a good fit for partners and end-users looking to leave McAfee’s EOL products behind.

Keep watching!