Monthly Archives: May 2016

Keyboard equipped with a red ransomware dollar button.

Ransomware is on the rise, but the authorities struggle to deal with it, so businesses often end up paying the ransom! What are security vendors doing to combat it?

You don’t need to look very far to see the hoo-ha that ransomware has recently caused.

This is not only because the sheer volume of ransomware attacks has swollen as never before (global cases increased by almost 170% in 2015, with the UK “disproportionately hit,” according to this FT.com article), but because the number of cases reported has actually gone down.

This can only lead to one conclusion: businesses are paying the ransom, in an attempt to get their businesses back up and running, because the authorities are failing to help them do so!

It’s one hell of a gamble. Cybercriminals aren’t exactly known for their integrity or willingness to be bound by contract, so where’s the guarantee that they’ll give businesses back the access to their files once they’ve coughed up?

Indeed, as FBI Cyber Division Assistant Director James Trainor has commented,  “Paying a ransom doesn’t guarantee an organisation that it will get its data back—we’ve seen cases where organisations never got a decryption key after having paid the ransom.”

Ransomware: what it is, what it does

Before we go any further, though, let’s clarify terms. All ransomware (CryptoLocker, CryptoWall, and CTBLocker are names that crop up often, but there are many others, some of which are listed here) is about blocking a business’s access to a system and/or its files until a sum of money is paid to the malefactor.

In practice, this happens in many different ways, varying from scareware, to browser or screen-locking software, to encrypting ransomware. (This Malwarebytes infographic, that our partners can now request to co-brand and use for their own marketing campaigns, explains it very neatly).

In a further malevolent twist, cyberattackers may choose to “leak” the files that they have sequestered if the ransom is not paid, exposing a business’s potentially confidential and legally privileged information to public view online.

Reputationally, this can be shattering, but the financial impact of ransomware is breathtaking too. The Verizon Data Breach Investigations report puts the business cost of losing access to just 1000 records at more than £46,000!

In short, businesses are vulnerable, the authorities are swamped, and there’s no honour among cyber thieves. So it’s down to security vendors to step up to the plate and prevent ransom situations from arising in the first place. Here’s a taste of how three of them are turning the tables on the file felons!

Bitdefender: cross-product protection at startup

Bitdefender’s answer to the ransomware challenge has been to develop a Ransomware Protection module that is included in all Bitdefender 2016 products (including business versions sold through the IT channel).

Clearly, this makes ransomware protection accessible to the end-user, regardless of the product they or their organisation have purchased.

But Bitdefender products also activate the Ransomware Protection module at startup, and scan all critical system areas before files are loaded, with zero impact on the system’s performance.

At the same time, protection is provided from certain attacks that rely on malware code execution, code injections, or hooks inside dynamic libraries, so defence against the ransomware is instant, broad, doesn’t slow end-users’ core computing tasks down, and – most importantly of all – doesn’t let the ransomware get a foothold.

Malwarebytes: ransomware protection throughout the infection timeline

Malwarebytes has built a solid reputation on its ability to detect, monitor and block malware of all kinds, right from the earliest attempts by the malware’s author to probe the most effective delivery methods.

This means it can spot indications of threatening behaviours way before the threat actually deploys – and it has applied this philosophy to its Anti-Ransomware product, too.

In the words of their security blog, it “uses advanced proactive technology that monitors what ransomware is doing and stops it cold before it even touches your files.” The ransomware therefore “has no shot at encrypting.”

Although the product is still in beta, it is based on an already successful application  - CryptoMonitor - that Malwarebytes acquired from EasySync Solutions, so its provenance certainly inspires trust.

We don’t yet know how Malwarebytes will market the general release version for business users through the IT channel. Will businesses be able to buy it standalone? Or as part of the existing Malwarebytes Endpoint Security suite?

The latter is already a truly potent bundle. It includes the powerful Anti-Malware solution that (uniquely!) also comes with an inbuilt remediation tool – that is to say, it can clean up already infected systems, making for some very grateful customers!

It also includes the Anti-Exploit solution, that detects the zero-day exploits that other solutions simply miss. Factoring Anti-Ransomware into this already compelling combination would be something of a coup!

Watch this space…

Trend Micro: fight ransomware at every layer

Ever the source of insightful and sobering security stats, Trend Micro has publicly announced that ransomware infections among UK firms in February 2016 alone far exceeded the figures for the first six months of 2015!

Its approach to fighting ransomware is highly layered, with Ransomware Protection features included in its endpoint products (OfficeScan, Worry-Free Business Security), email and gateway products (ScanMail, Cloud App Security, Hosted Email Security, amongst others) and network products (Deep Discovery).

Trend Micro was named a Leader in the 2016 Endpoint Protection Platforms Magic Quadrant, published by industry analyst Gartner. This covers, amongst other technologies, anti-ransomware, so Trend’s solutions are definitely “up there” when it comes to stopping businesses being held at gunpoint!

Anti-ransomware: a pattern emerges

In all the three vendor cases mentioned above, there is a strong underlying truth: everything turns on being able to stop the ransomware infection happening in the first place. Once files are infected, it’s way too late.

This knowledge has certainly been an incentive for security vendors to act. If it’s not an incentive for businesses and the IT channel partners who supply them to act, too, I don’t know what is.

Benefits of managed IT servicesTwo thirds of companies now use managed service providers (CompTIA survey). But how should MSPs educate customers about the services they provide? See these tips.

In my last post, I wrote about the benefits of selling services through the MSP model, rather than relying on old-fashioned, unpredictable break-fix.

All well and good, but that’s often also about selling your customers on something new and different, when they’re used to something established and familiar – and we all know how difficult that can be!

So I spoke to some customers and some colleagues, and cast around on the internet, and came up with these useful tips to help you convince your customers that MSP is the way forward!

1. Don’t major on the technology. As this article in CRN eloquently argues, the mechanics of features and functions are absolutely not what will prompt your customer to make a decision in favour of MSP.

What your customers are really interested in is how MSP solutions can help them decrease risk, reduce costs, and – perhaps most critically of all – increase productivity.

Industry reports and analysis can strongly support your pitch in this respect. Comptia’s annual Trends In Managed Services research, for example, (you can see a non-gated slideshow summary here), contains some excellent references to productivity gains, savings, and ROI, all of which will be useful to you in a sales situation.


2. Ditch the “jargon monoxide”.
Do you have any idea how downright poisonous some of the language accepted in IT circles can be to someone seeking to make a purchasing decision?

Simplicity and clarity are watchwords in any sales situation, but when you’re trying to persuade a customer to abandon the break-fix model that they may have trusted for many years, they become critical. Test your pitch on friends, family members, and deeply non-technical colleagues – and if they don’t instantly “get it”, rethink it.

The psychological impact of obscure language is immensely damaging to MSP sales relationships – as this piece in MSPblog explains. Want to make your customer feel stupid? Make them feel like they’re excluded from your clique? Want to make it sound like you’re lying through your teeth? Then carry on using the jargon.

Change is already disruptive and painful for customers – don’t make it unfathomable and repellent too.


3. Get over the monthly rate objection.
From your point of view, the fixed monthly payment for your MSP services makes perfect sense – regular, predictable income in return for always-on monitoring and service.

Only, many customers won’t necessarily get that last part. In their mind, the choice you are giving them is between a monthly outflow of cash to protect them against something that “might never happen”, and an hourly rate that they only have to pay if something goes wrong.

The way to convince them is to highlight just how bad things could get if that something does go wrong. Would they get hit by financial loss if they were to experience more than, say, an hour’s downtime, for example?

How much have they invested in their IT infrastructure and how much more would they have to add to that to cover hourly-rate remediation in the event of something like major data loss or theft?

You won’t have to search very far to find some seriously compelling statistics on this subject. I wrote in another post recently that 58% of SMBs could not withstand any data loss whatsoever.

Consider, in addition, that data loss and downtime cost the UK £10.5 billion per year, according to this piece in TechWeek Europe, and one Gartner analyst has cited an hourly downtime cost, based on company size and type, of between $140,000 and $540,000 per hour!


4. Listen to pain points and tailor solutions.
The MSP model has brought a flexibility to the sales process that previously didn’t exist – particularly when it is teamed with solutions delivered through the cloud that can be switched on and off and scaled up and down on demand.

In fact, the reality is that there are very few solutions you couldn’t offer in an MSP version to meet your customers’ varied needs. From endpoint security, to data backup and recovery, and of course much more, it’s all up for grabs – but you need to understand your customers’ pain points first!

As MSPAlliance recently put it, (my italics), "MSPs must become supremely comfortable interacting with customers on a business level. This means knowing the business of your customers and being able to ask questions and listen to what causes them pain. Once the pain point has been identified, a technical solution to it can be created."


5. Master the proposal process.
It’s not only complex language that turns your MSP prospects off, it’s a sales proposal process that feels like it’s trying to funnel them into a one-size-fits-all solution, exacerbating their fear of the new and unknown.

The MSP model makes possible multiple alternative solutions in multiple combinations, so use them to give your customers a sense of choice and control. This isn’t break-fix-land, where every additional solution ratchets up the risk of an hourly-rate repair job, so don’t pitch it like it is!

For a superb, methodical sales proposal process that will help you to convincingly align solutions options with your MSP customers’ needs, check out this MSP blog post.


Get selling to your MSP customers!

I’ve said enough now – it’s your turn to evangelise! But remember, if you’re asking your customers to turn their back on the devil they know, they might need a little help understanding that MSP solutions could be their guardian angel…